Author Growth

Hello, SEers, and welcome to another Mae Day on Story Empire. Let’s chat writer growth. 

Vintage typewriter surrounded by crumpled paper sheets. Writer and blogger concept.
All images from BigstockPhoto

Last winter, a local newspaper featured me in an article. I was extremely flattered they were interested enough to profile me. What appealed to them was that I hadn’t written one book or two, but ten (along with three novellas and several short stories in anthologies). I remember the interviewer telling me, “That’s an impressive body of work.” It relayed a message that I was in it for the long haul. 

Since that interview, I’ve released a collection of short stories and have two finished manuscripts waiting in the wings. It made me realize how long I’ve been doing this. Not just writing, but publishing. I started crafting stories in grade school, wrote my first short at eight, and my first novel at fifteen. But having my work published? That didn’t happen until 2012. It’s now ten years later, and when I look back on my first release it’s with mixed emotions. 

I wrote steamy romantic suspense in those days. Two books that got my foot in the door with a small press. I still love both novels—the characters I created, and the mysteries twined throughout the plots—but my writing was not on par with my skillset today. The stories are also not representative of my work, as I’ve switched genres, favoring mystery/suspense with elements of folklore and the supernatural. Someday, I imagine myself reworking my earliest novels, stripping out the steam and building on the legends I included. Someday, when time isn’t a burden but a pleasurable companion that permits plenty of leeway. 

Young woman writing on laptop computer at desk in a home office

In the meantime, I count both bodies of work (and even a few that followed) as part of my learning curve. Every author experiences growth. As creative sorts, it’s not in our nature to be stagnant. We’re constantly honing our craft and evolving, even experimenting as we become more comfortable in our writer skins. Remember how terrified you felt when you sent your first book baby into the world? I’m not saying I don’t still feel apprehension before a release, but the trauma has lessened. I tell myself You’ve done this before. You’ve got this. 

And, by no means, am I done growing. I follow several New York Times best-selling authors with long track records. I definitely see a difference between their first/earlier releases and their current works. That didn’t make those first books any less enjoyable, but I have a new appreciation of how far they’ve come. That realization makes me appreciate and recognize my own growth. 

In my day job, I hold a professional license regulated by state and national commissions. Because of constant industry changes, I’m required to take mandated continuing education every two years in order for my license to remain active. Writers may not have to do CE, but it’s in our best interest to keep current with changing trends, industry updates, and—most importantly—honing our craft.

Use these suggestions for growth: 

Learn from your peers (take critiques and constructive reviews in stride) 
Work with critique partners and/or beta readers
Join local writing groups
Join professional writing organizations
Take online craft courses
Purchase craft books
Attend writing conferences/conventions
READ!! (Especially in your chosen genre) 
Keep writing! 

That last one is so important. I’m going to challenge you to look back at some of your earlier work. My guess is that you’re going to see several areas for improvement. That’s not a bad thing. It means you’ve grown as an author. As with any profession, the longer you work in a field, the more adept you become. Regardless of where you are in your writing career—just starting, middle of the road, seasoned pro—there is always room for growth.  

One of my earliest writing experiences (decades ago) involved submitting a manuscript for agent representation that I was CERTAIN would be accepted. There was no question in my mind I had written a thoroughly polished and professional manuscript, but just thinking about it now makes me cringe. Saying it was bad is putting it mildly. That foolish young writer still had so much yet to learn. Fortunately, after being rejected more than once, I was smart enough to realize I still had a ton of growing to do.

What about you? Do you believe you’ve grown as an author? Can you look back at earlier work and note improvement? What do you consider the key element in your growth to date? What do you do to keep your craft honed and your writing polished? 

Let’s chat about in the comments. Ready, set, go!

bio box for author, Mae Clair

88 thoughts on “Author Growth

  1. Im just a new author with only two publications(1 poetry, and 1 novel) with a second novel coming soon but I did learn a lot from my first novel. I keep my writing polished through writing for my blog and reading numerous literature on ‘tips for writers’ etc. I’m a big believer in story over writing proess though I’m definitely aiming to tick both checkboxes. I find that good stories are all around us; in people, movies, documentaries, even nature and interesting inanimate objects. How to tell themhas been intuitive thought I’ve come to realise that comes from subconsciously observing how screenwriters and novelists do it. It’s a difficult journey for someone still in uni and working and thinking about marriage, but I wouldn’t trade it for anything!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Jude! I love that you are doing what you love to do with writing (and learning and growing in the writing process) while still in uni. There is never a perfect time to embrace the creative muse. Those of us who entertain him/her, do so while juggling all the other intrusive aspects of life, but we wouldn’t have it any other way. You sound like you are in it for the long haul, and for that I applaud your dedication–both to the craft and to learning more as you embrace it.
      Congrats on the books you have released. I wish you much happy writing ahead.
      Thank you for visiting Story Empire and sharing your thoughts!

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  2. Hi Mae, I like to think of myself as a life long learner. I am always experimenting and trying out new things and it is the same with my writing. When I wrote While the Bombs Fell I sent it to a developmental editor. I knew it would need work and I needed guidance. Boy, did I get a lot of fantastic advice, and I practically restructured and re-wrote the entire book. It took me as long to restructure that book as it took for the first rewrite, but I learned so much. It was an amazing experience to learn like that and watch my book evolving into something so much better by the end. I took that learning and used it when I wrote Through the Nethergate which was another enormous learning leap for me. Again, I spent months editing and re-writing it and the manuscript and story were hugely improved by the end. A Ghost and His Gold didn’t require as bit an overhaul as I had already learned a lot. Now, my learning isn’t as enormous, but it is still vital and I think I am slowly improving all the time. That being said, I am often amazed by the work of other authors I read and I sometimes wonder why I think I can write at all. The desire remains though and so I push on and keep working at it. I have accepted that I’ll never be a full time writer, but it is a fabulous hobby and and excellent challenge, and I love this blogging community.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi, Robbie. It sounds like your author journey has followed the same path as many—with each release we learn and grow, reducing the learning curve each time. That said, we’re also always open to learning and building on our knowledge base. Recent changes in my life have made me realize it’s unlikely I will ever be a full-time writer either, but like you, I love doing it. Writing is something I’ve done non-stop since I was a young child, and I don’t see myself ever stopping. I may step back, adjusting my writing time to life circumstances, but I never intend to stop—or stop learning in the process!

      Thanks for dropping by to share your thoughts!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Mae, I think there is some peace in reaching the understanding that writing has its place in your life but won’t ever replace your day job. It brings more acceptance all around. With the way prices for everything are skyrocketing, I doubt I’ll even be able to retire early, but that is the lot of most of us. I hope all is well with you, I haven’t seen you around much lately.

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      • I like what you said, Robbie. I think I’ve reached that point where I’ve made peace with writing and the day job.
        Ironically, my day job is what has been keeping me offline lately. Just a LOT of major changes, but they’re all good. They’re also keeping me extremely busy, and I haven’t had much ambition for anything else. Hopefully, I can find a better balance and starting making rounds online again. I miss everyone!

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  3. Wonderful post, Mae! And to answer your questions, I could see room for improvement in my first book even as I was writing my second. If I had both of them to do over, I’d definitely make changes.

    I like to think my writing gets a bit stronger with each book, though that could just be wishful thinking. But at my age, I don’t want to spend my time going back over my early efforts. I’ve considered it, believe me, but decided my time would be better spent moving ahead with new stories, hopefully written with a sharper skill set. However, if I thought I’d still be writing for another 5 to 10 years, I’d probably try to find some time to go back and do some serious trimming and tightening in those first books. Who knows? It could happen! 😁

    Thanks for a thought provoking post, Mae, as always! 😀 ❤

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    • I can so relate to what you said, Marcia. Part of me would love to do my first two novels (mostly just to remove the steam factor), but every time I consider it, I think about the stories I have yet to tell, and the WIPs in progress. They’re a bit of a siren, summoning me to concentrate on the future rather than the past.

      On the flip side, I realize that even most NYT BSA’s would probably like to redo their first few efforts, so I consider myself in good company. 😆

      So glad you enjoyed the post, and I wish you happy writing, my friend!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Why am I not surprised that we are in synch with our thoughts on this? 😁 And while I wouldn’t call my love scenes in Books 1 & 2 “steamy” per se, they are definitely taking up a lot a larger part of the story than anything in my later books. I pulled away from that a bit, and now when I write romantic scenes, I focus more on “pillow talk,” which I really enjoy writing.

        I’d definitely pare back the longer love scenes in my first two books were I reworking them again. I never did write anything graphic, but I thought I needed them to be more involved and lengthy for today’s readers. I don’t feel that way now, and while I still like including a romance (or two) in my books, those scenes are much shorter, as I’d rather focus more on other parts of the story.

        I really enjoy learning from each other, Mae, and this post was another step in that direction. Thanks!!! Wishing you happy writing, too! 😀 ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ha! We are definitely of the same mindset when it comes to our earlier work. I think my work was probably a bit more steamy then yours (def R, but never past that). I wrote what I did to get my foot in the door with a publisher then scaled it back when I could. Today, I still enjoy including a romantic thread in my stories, but it’s more about the mystery with any attraction taking backstage to the main plot. I guess that’s just another mark of growth on my author journey. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, and I’m so glad the post inspired you. We ALL started at the beginning at one time or another and had to step up our game. I’m cheering you on as you continue your writing journey!

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  4. As a teacher, I believe in a life of learning, and that carries into my author world. Recently, I published a book that I had written and left on the shelf for over ten years. There was a lot of rework I had to do to it, but like you said, that just showed me how far I’ve come. I have one other book sitting on a shelf unpublished, and I hope to get around to it one day. The more one writes, the better he/she will write. If we honor our craft, then we will continue to pursue excellence in writing by learning new skills and practice. Great post, Mae! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yvette, I love that you published a book from such an early draft. I’ve done that with a few of mine, too. The stories were too good to abandon, but the writing seriously lacked in my early drafts. I had a lot of clean up to do, but am so thankful I did. I’m sure you feel the same way.

      And I thoroughly agree that the more we honor and pursue excellence in our craft, the more adept we’ll become. Thank you for sharing your thoughts today!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Thank you, Mae, for sharing your journey as a writer and how you’ve evolved in your craftmanship. I’m relatively new at being a published author but have begun to experiment with short stories and other genres to challenge myself. These have been great experiences that have helped me to be a better writer.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Linnea. Thanks for dropping by to visit today. I applaud you for experimenting in the craft. Just last year I released a collection of short stories after nine years of publishing novels and series work. It was such a pleasure to embrace that medium—kind of like taking recess. It’s always good to challenge and spread our writing wings. I’m so glad you’re finding fulfillment on your writing journey and experiencing growth. That’s what it’s all about! 🙂

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  6. I enjoyed this post. Thanks, Mae Clair. I am, I suppose, a bit weird in that I like my early work. As you suggested, it was not perfect (lol- far from it) but it had a youthful enthusiasm that I think some of my work lacks these days. The push, the effort, the bizarre creativity has faded a little, much as I am doing as I age.
    My books, short stories, and Novellas are better written, they come from a wiser and more accomplished head. They, perhaps, are even more knowledgeable, better plotted and at times devious but sometimes when I read my early novels, I wince, but not as many have mentioned. I notice, rather, what I have lost. That easy ability to adapt and change, the simple versatility, the overwhelming urge to get a remarkable story out there. Perhaps ability and experience is not all that is required. Lol- your post made me think.

    Liked by 1 person

    • What an insightful and excellent comment, Ray. I fully understand appreciating the enthusiasm of those early works. The MC in my first published novel probably remains my favorite to date. I love the character, even the story, I just wish I’d handled some things a bit differently. Wouldn’t it be ideal if we could combine that early sheen of excitement and whimsy with our later knowledge and skill? I guess it’s a bit like aging from child to adult, and striving to keep the magic of childhood alive. I hope I will always maintain that passion for writing. My post may have made you pause and think, but your comment did the same for me.
      Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

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  7. Great post, thoughtful, incisive, and supportive too, sharing some of your own down times.
    Taking a book apart for a complete rebuild – as Jan Sikes reports ? That’s what I’m doing now, and have learned so much from Story Empire people.
    When a character I’d underestimated developed, so, I hope, did all the others.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Esther. I know I speak for all the SE authors when I say we appreciate that wonderful comment about learning from the SE group. Our whole purpose with this blog is to help other writers, share what we know and, hopefully, inspire.
      I’m cheering you on in taking your book apart and rebuilding it. It sounds like your characters have made quite an impression on you! 🙂

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  8. “And, by no means, am I done growing.”

    I think that’s the most important thing I read in this wonderful post, Mae. You’ve accomplished so much. You’ve grown so much but you aren’t done. That’s inspiring. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for the lovely comment, Dan. I’m glad you found the message of the post inspiring. It’s so important that we never stop growing, and always look ahead in our writer’s journey. I’m glad you and others are on that same journey with me!

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  9. This post really speaks to me, Mae. I remember the process of writing Jazz Baby. There were years involved. I made sure it was as good as I could make it at that time, before publishing it. It was that apprehension of which you wrote that kept me from unleashing it three or four years sooner. I still carry that apprehension to this day. I find it serves me well. I am at work on two novels that will see release only when they are ready. I’ve learned a ton of stuff about this craft in the ten years since my first published work. I hope I am still learning when I finish my last story in this realm. Thanks for this amazing piece.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Beem. I’m so glad you enjoyed this post. I relate to a lot what you said. I was anxious to get my first release out there. Yes, I took my time with it, and it went through a small press and copy and content editors, but it could have been better. Now I am sitting on two books because I’m just not ready to release them. What a change from that author who was so ready for that first release ten years ago. Like you, I’ve learned a lot about the craft, and like you, I will wait until the timing is right. I’m still learning with every draft and release, and hope that never changes.

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts today!

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  10. I’m not sure I’ve even found a constant voice yet. I definitely see huge changes in my style from my early days to now. But I guess that’s proof that we continue to learn and grown (thank goodness). Great post, Mae.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think we grow with every draft we write and every book we release, Staci. And maybe now and then our voice changes slightly in the process. I think we have a core voice but it does shift and grow even as we do.
      So glad you enjoyed the post. Thanks for sharing your thoughts today!

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  11. I know you’ve been busy so it’s wonderful to see you out here. Love your thoughts on your own growth–“more comfortable in our writer skins”, “time isn’t a burden but a pleasurable companion”. Such a great way to put both ideas. And your list of suggestions–excellent.

    Liked by 1 person

    • HI, Jacqui. So good to have you drop by and check out the post. Life has thrown me an unexpected curve ball but I hope to be able to pop online again on at least a semi-regular basis very soon.
      I’m so glad you enjoyed this post and the suggestions for continued growth. May we never become stagnant.
      I wish you happy writing! 😄

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  12. Great post, Mae 🙂 I feel like I will never stop learning and growing. I am doing a re-edit of a children’s book, or my second release. I let someone edit it a few years ago, and have since learned so much that I have to fix what they did to it. I have no problem now taking out entire paragraphs and did. I can’t wait to see what I’ve learned in another few years, it is such a interesting process where I will never be bored!

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    • I’m so glad you were able to go back and edit that earlier book, Denise. I think it makes a world of difference when we can polish work to our expectations, especially when we look back on it with hindsight. Like you, I look forward to where I will be in another 5 or 10 years. I consider every year another one of growth and maturity as a writer. It’s awesome that we’re all in this together! 🙂

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  13. Absolutely, Mae! Growth is crucial for writers. Like you, I look back on earlier works and cringe. I’m still nervous each time I release a new book, even after ten years. It isn’t until I start hearing from readers that I can breathe again. Doubt I’ll ever be 100% comfortable. My go-to’s are craft books and craft blogs. I’m constantly learning new things from writers I admire (like you!).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Aww, thanks, Sue. 🤗
      How cool—I just realized we started publishing at the same time. 2012 was when I released my first book, too. It’s crazy to think a whole decade has passed. Like you, I still get nervous every time I release a new title. I wonder if those jitters ever go away.

      I’m not the best with craft books, but I do enjoy craft blogs, and I’m constantly learning from my peers.

      I haven’t been online in ages due to some personal upheaval, but I have to tell you—hubby and I took a trip to Cape Cod in early June, and were in a local bookstore when I spotted Pretty Evil New England. I was so excited I took a picture. I think everyone in the near vicinity heard my shriek and exclamation about how good the book was and that I knew the author personally.

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      • The bookstore was called Titcombs in East Sandwich, Cape Cod. Three floors of amazing books, collectibles and oddities. I fell in love with it. I found your book in a section devoted to all things Cape Cod. I had planned to do a post about it when I returned, but life threw me a huge curveball and I’ve been offline since (I hope to rectify that and explain what happened within the next week). Anyway, I will send you the pics. I can’t figure out how to include them with this comment!

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  14. Oh the earlier works… Those stories are almost comical now, from the mind of a child. I’ve come a long way & have a lot further to go! You’ve shared a great post, Mae! Thank you so much for the trip down memory lane. ❤

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    • HI, Mar! Isn’t it amazing the growth we can see in our work when we look back at our first venture(s) out the gate?
      I love that the journey is unending and there is always something new to chase on the horizon.

      Thanks for visiting today and sharing your thoughts. I wish you happy writing and continued growth! 🙂

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  15. Practice makes…. better. 🙂 I totally agree with you, Mae, that anything we do over and over again gets better with each trial. It’s easy to see in our work as well as that of the mainstream names. Excellent tips for speeding up the learning curve. Continuing to educate ourselves and hone our craft is vital. 🙂 Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Diana. I’ve recognized growth in my own writing, but it was quite an eye-opener when I started to see it in the writing of NYT BSA’s as well. I guess it really is true that practice makes perfect—or in the case of writing—practice makes us better! 🙂

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts today. So glad you enjoyed the post!

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  16. As with anything you undertake, you should grow and improve with time. I prefer the mystery/thriller genre best. But I realized that to become a better, well rounded writer, I needed to try other genres. Since they weren’t in my preferred writing style, they took more work and research, and I learned so much.

    Looking back, my initial work don’t reflect the writer I have become. It’s a learning curve, but if you make the leap, you will not regret it.

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    • Michele, I applaud you for trying your hand at other genres. I think I’ve experimented with most of them at one time or another, but I was called to them when I did. I don’t think I’ve ever written in another genre when called to a different one. That’s gutsy and takes determination. Good for you!

      I can relate to that learning curve when it comes to writing. I’m still in the leaping process, and loving every minute of it! 🙂

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  17. Thanks for the inspiration, Mae! Like growth spurts as a kid, pain is part of the process. But with each level comes a sense of wonder, and the realization it’s a process of continuous improvement. Just as I now smile looking back at silly grade-school photos, my first books no longer embarrass me. I would not be where I am today without those initial efforts. My freedom came with the realization it’s all about principles, not rules, and that leaves endless avenues to explore.

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    • That’s wonderfully said, Grant! We first have to crawl before we can walk. If we didn’t make those initial clumsy attempts with writing, we’d never be where we are today. I like your comparison between grade school photos with early writing.
      So glad you stopped by to share your thoughts. I wish you more avenues to explore on your author journey and happy writing!

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  18. I’ve read writers who write the same book over and over again, just with different names and settings. It’s like they’ve found a formula and never switch up. I read a few of their books, then fizzle. I never think I’ve written THE book. I’m always trying to get a little better. Sometimes, that means I try something new that doesn’t quite work, but the next time, maybe I’ll nail it. I hope.

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    • Thank you, Harmony. Looking back on those earliest works is the same for me. It’s amazing how much my writing has matured over the years. It makes me wonder how I’ll view it in another five years. I know I hope I never stop learning and growing.
      Glad you enjoyed today’s post!

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  19. Great post, Mae! Everything in life is a work in progress and writing is like that, too. I used to read books by an established and popular author but she stuck with the same format and the same ideas and I think she may have felt that she’d made the grade as a writer and didn’t need to work on it any more. I became bored with her writing style and stopped reading her. Since then I’ve found some wonderful writers in this community and it’s a pleasure to read their work – yours definitely included! xx

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    • Interesting comment, Trish. Now that I think back, I can see other BSA’s that I did the same thing with. There weren’t many but I can call to mind at least two. I like when authors continue to grow and their writing reflects that. It sounds like you’ve found some new authors you enjoy. I’m honored to be included among them! 😊💕

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  20. I have always considered my writing as a work in progress. I don’t think I’m ever going to believe I have nothing more to learn. Each day brings something I didn’t know from the day before. A super post, Mae. Thanks.

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  21. What a thoughtful post, Mae. I can definitely look back on my writing journey and see the growth. It is always my goal to make each body of work better than the last. My first book should not have been published in the state it was in. It needed another thorough edit with a knowledgeable editor. The so-called editor I paid was way below par and certainly not a good match for a newbie author. Warning flags should have gone up when he continued to misspell my name. But I knew nothing or no one else to turn to at the time. So a few years ago, I pulled that book down and reworked it. I should do that with all of those first books, but time doesn’t allow it. Maybe someday. You are so right when you say we can learn from each other. A great example is the wonderful posts that the Story Empire authors share. I’ve learned LOTS from them. I also agree that reading is another great way to learn. It’s hard to read a book now without a critical eye. Passive writing and telling jump out at me. Writing is a fluid craft, and we will never learn it all. The joy has to be in the journey itself as there is no firm destination. Thank you for sharing this today! Here’s to the onward and upward climb!

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    • Jan, that’s awful you had such a bad initial experience with publishing. A good editor makes all the difference in how work is polished and presented. We do, however, learn from our mistakes and I know I’ve made many of them myself. It’s great to have the support and encouragement of others during our writing journey. Like you, I often now look at books I’m reading with a critical eye, but that’s thanks to all I’ve learned during my journey. So many were willing to help me along the way. I love what I’ve learned through SE and also online in the blogging/publishing world.

      As you said—onward and upward! Thanks for sharing your thoughts today!,

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  22. Wonderfully thoughtful post, Mae, with great suggestions for growth. I’m always very supportive of new writers. Those first books are like the stumbles of a baby. They need the encouragement of experienced writers and others, to find their way. Thank you for reminding us that we are all on a journey. 😊

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the post, Gwen. Isn’t it interesting that no matter how polished we feel that first release is, in hindsight it almost always seems like it could have been better. I love that there are so many peers and mentors to help us and encourage us on our journey. Thanks for sharing your thoughts today!

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    • Isn’t it true there are always those ahead of us, as well as those behind us? It’s interesting to look back an see how far we’ve come–and also to know we still have so far to go.
      Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Craig!

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  23. I cringe when I think of my earlier work, but writing is a journey. One where we should grow and not be satisfied to remain stagnant. I’ve done all the things on your list at one time or another. I would read even if I didn’t write. I’ve never understood “writers” who say they don’t have time to read.

    Great post, Mae.

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    • Well said, Joan. Growth is so important. We never want to remain stagnant. I’ve come to realize that even the top names in the industry can look back on their earlier work and realize it needs polish. Good thing we love this journey so much!

      I agree with you about reading, too. It’s one of the most important thing a writer can do, regardless what stage they are at in their own journey.
      Thanks for sharing your thoughts today!

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  24. I enjoyed reading this and felt hopeful for my own writing 🙂 Well, I’ve been writing since I learned how to write, and I definitely can see that my writing style (or should I say voice?) has drastically changed over the years. And I’m still a beginner and have never lost my beginner mind; that still fuels my curiosity. Yet, I still can’t say it improved how I would like it to be. It’s mainly because I don’t keep writing as you and many other writers suggest. I write sporadically and am not good at scheduling posts and being an organized person at all. I know my weaknesses and strengths as a person, and I’d like to explore myself as a writer more. But perhaps, recognizing one’s weaknesses itself is an improvement? I don’t know.

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    • Hi, Bahanur. What a thoughtful and honest comment! Recognizing one’s weaknesses is absolutely an improvement! Only by recognizing them can you choose to address them and move ahead. It’s really difficult to factor in time for writing. Currently, I’m struggling with that myself. I haven’t even blogged for over a month due to some circumstances in my life. As long as the passion for writing is there, you will always return to it and continue to grow. The fact that you WANT to grow and have that curiosity for growth is a plus in itself. I’ve met writers who thought they knew everything there is to learn. That is never the case, and I never want to be that writer. Sounds like you don’t want to either.
      Thanks for visiting and sharing your thoughts today!

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  25. Pingback: Author Growth | Legends of Windemere

  26. I think our writing can mirror our life in that we can look back at things and cringe. Studying the craft and being open to my editors suggestions have both helped me to continue to grow as a writer. I don’t think there’s ever a finish line, so I try not to rush the process. Great post, Mae! It’s good to see you. I hope you’re well. xo

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    • “I don’t think there’s ever a finish line.” What a great observation, Jill, and one all writers should adopt. I’m completely onboard with that philosophy.
      I’ve also learned a lot through the suggestions of my editors and my critique partners. When we’re open to suggestions, we can really grow.

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts today. And for the kind words. I do hope to be back online on a regular basis again soon. I miss everyone!

      Liked by 2 people

  27. Great post, Mae. I recently found a small collection of poems I wrote back in 1989. The poems are a rambling of couplets (that is what I thought poetry was at the time.) Nowadays my style is contemporary but, as you say, it is good to look back and see where you have moved on your journey. Another writer told me never to beat yourself up about older pieces of writing. She said they were a photograph of where you were at the time. I think that allows me to look at my work with a more critical and less judgmental eye.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi, David. I positively love what that other writers said about previous works being a photograph of where a writer or poet was at the time. That’s a fabulous observation. Finding something you wrote in 1989 must have been fun and eyeopening to review. When I look back at work I wrote decades ago it, I frequently cringe but I also do a lot of chuckling. More so, I see the emerging writer in those very early works. I can see the mistakes with my critical eye, and at the same time embrace the raw story ideas that drove my creativity.

      Thanks for sharing a bit of your own journey today! 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

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